Resources for Integrating Faith and Mathematics

Well, it is coming down to the end of the spring semester. I am going to be quite busy over the next few weeks making sure I have all my work completed and turned in and that everything is set for graduation. So I don’t know how many posts I might get up before the middle of May. Here are a couple of articles to hold you over until then. If you read through these too quick and are left waiting for more, then check out the link on the top of page: “Resources for Integrating Faith and Mathematics.”

“The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences,” Eugene Wigner

Wigner observes that the mathematical structure of a physics theory often points the way to further advances in that theory and even to empirical predictions. He argues that this is not just a coincidence and therefore must reflect some larger and deeper truth about both mathematics and physics.

“On Christian Scholarship,” Alvin Plantinga

How should a Christian university and how should the Christian intellectual community think about scholarship and science? Should the kind of scholarship and science that go on at a Catholic university differ from the sort that goes on elsewhere? If so, in what way? Plantinga presents one sort of view–not with the thought that this is the whole and unvarnished truth, but as a contribution to our conversation.

“Advice to Christian Philosophers,” Alvin Plantinga

In each area of serious intellectual endeavor the fundamental and often unexpressed presuppositions that govern and direct the discipline are not religiously neutral; they are often antithetic to a Christian perspective. In these areas then it is up to Christians who practice the relevant discipline to develop the right Christian alternatives. Plantinga pursues this primarily from his own discipline of philosophy, but the ideas translate into all areas of scholarship.

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