APAC 2016: Statistics, Significance, and Service

I’ve started a new site for service-learning resources in mathematics: SLmath.com.

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This week I am leading a workshop at the 2016 AP Annual Conference on “Statistics, Significance, and Service” in Anaheim, CA. The talk is on integrating service-learning projects into AP Statistics curriculum, specifically with the goal of impacting students on an affective level. In addition to the resources that you will find below, feel free to check out some of the prior posts on service learning:

ABSTRACT:

This session will equip participants to design, implement, and evaluate service-learning based statistics projects in which students partner with non-profit organizations in their local community. These projects synthesize the major concepts of experimental design, data analysis, and statistical inference in the real-world context of community service, ultimately cultivating in students a deeper appreciation for the discipline of statistics. In this session participants will evaluate successful examples of such projects, critically analyze the benefits of the innovative assessment methods involved, and engage in discussion assessing the feasibility and logistics of implementing service projects in their own curriculum.

(This session will expand on the session “Serving the Community through Statistics” from the 2015 AP Annual Conference by including results of my completed dissertation research on cultivating a productive disposition in statistics students through service learning)

PRESENTATION:

You can click the image below to find the PowerPoint that accompanied my presentation.

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10 THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE IMPLEMENTING A SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT:

The following are the foundational questions that you as an instructor should consider and reflect upon prior to implementing a service-learning project. This list is not meant to be chronological though some aspects will naturally precede others. Start by considering the course learning objectives and your method of assessing those objectives and then go from there.

1.What are the major learning objectives/big ideas/enduring understandings for your course?

The purpose of the AP course in statistics is to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:

  • Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns
  • Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study
  • Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation
  • Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses

2. What are real-world situations where students can apply the concepts studied in your course?

  • Identifying a non-profit service agency which requires survey research (program evaluation, client needs assessment, etc.)
  • Students develop a survey instrument, conduct survey, compile and code data, analyze data, present results

3. List some potential community partners along with some basic descriptors that may impact how your students work with each partner (ex: What is the size of the organization? What issues does the organization address? Is the organization non-profit, governmental, religiously affiliated? Etc.) In lieu of a partner organization you can also consider a general community need for students to address. List some general descriptors of the project involved in addressing this community need.

4. Look for potential matches between organizations on your list from question 3 and your responses to questions 1 and 2. If there are multiple potential matches then consider the pros/cons of each and list them. Be sure to recognize how your matching affects the organization of the project (large scale as a class v. small scale as groups), which in turn may affect your response to question 5 below.

5. Once you have begun narrowing potential community partners that offer opportunities for students to interact with course content, consider how will you assess students? What will be the final product? What expectations will you have for students throughout the project and how will you communicate that to the students?

6. How will students be organized to meet the objectives that they will be assessed on? Will students work as individuals, teams, as a whole class?

7. How will students be equipped to complete the project successfully? What will they have gained from the course up to the point of assigning the project that will aid them? What additional tools/skills/knowledge will students need as the project proceeds?

8. What will be the timeframe for the project? How will students be held accountable to the timeframe? At what points will students receive feedback on their progress?

9. Why should students care about the project? What will you do as an instructor to get student buy-in on the project?

10. How will students reflect throughout the project? What opportunities will you provide for students to pause and consider the work they have done?

HANDOUTS:

From my 2015-16 AP Statistics Project (Organized as an entire class project over the full year):

From my 2014-15 AP Statistics Project (Organized as small group projects in the spring semester):

*NOTE: some documents above were also used in this project, either in the form in which they are posted above or in a slightly modified version

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Hadlock, C.R. (2005). Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

            Chapter 3: Service-Learning in Statistics

Reed, G. (2005). “Perspectives on statistics projects in a service-learning framework.” In C.R. Hadlock (Ed.), Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

Root, R., Thorme, T., & Gray, C. (2005). “Making meaning, applying statistics.” In C.R. Hadlock (Ed.), Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

Sungur, E.A., Anderson, J.E., & Winchester, B.S. (2005). “Integration of service-learning into statistics education.” In C.R. Hadlock (Ed.), Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

Hydorn, D.L. (2005). “Community service projects in a first statistics course.” In C.R. Hadlock (Ed.), Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

Massey, M. (2005). “Service-learning projects in data interpretation.” In C.R. Hadlock (Ed.), Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

Chapter 6: Getting Down to Work

Webster, J. & Vinsonhaler, C. (2005). “Getting down to work – a ‘how-to’ guide for designing and teaching a service-learning course.” In C.R. Hadlock (Ed.), Mathematics in service to the community: Concepts and models for service-learning in the mathematical sciences. Washington, DC: Mathematical Association of America.

“Service-Learning and Mathematics” webpage:

Bailey, B. & Sinn, R. (2011). “Real Data & Service Learning Projects in Statistics.” Service-learning in collegiate mathematics, MAA contributed paper session, 2011 Joint Mathematics Meetings, New Orleans, LA.

Hydorn, D. (2011). “Community Service-Learning in Mathematics: Models for Course Design.” Service-learning in collegiate mathematics, MAA contributed paper session, 2011 Joint Mathematics Meetings, New Orleans, LA.

PRIMUS, Vol. 23 (6)

Hadlock, C.R. (2013). “Service-learning in the mathematical sciences.” PRIMUS, Vol. 23 (6), pp. 500-506.

Other

Lynn Adsit’s blog on implementing a service-learning project in AP Stats

Harry, A. & Troisi, J. (2014). “Service-Oriented Statistics.” 

Hampton, M.C. (1995). Syllabus for Intro to Statistics. University of Utah. 

Duke, J.I. (1999). “Service-Learning: taking mathematics into the real world.” The Mathematics Teacher, 92 (9), pp. 794-796, 799.

Leong, J. (2006). High school students’ attitudes and beliefs regarding statistics in a service-learning-based statistics course. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Georgia State University.

For many of the service-learning projects that my students have completed I am indebted to the willing partnership of Mobile Loaves and Fishes. Here is some introductory information on this great ministry:

Community First! Village Goes Beyond Housing for Austin Homeless, from the Austinot

CAMT 2016: Cultivating Mathematical Affections through Service-Learning

2016_logo

This week I am leading a workshop at the 2016 Conference for the Advancement of Mathematics Teaching in San Antonio, TX on “Cultivating Mathematical Affections through Service-Learning.” The talk is on integrating service-learning projects into mathematics curriculum, specifically with the goal of impacting students on an affective level. Since this is my dissertation topic, I’ve written about it numerous times before here on GodandMath.com. In addition to the resources that you will find below, feel free to check out some of the prior posts on service learning:

ABSTRACT:

This session will equip participants to design, implement, and evaluate service-learning projects in which students partner with non-profit organizations. Through these projects, students integrate their conceptual understanding of math with the practical functioning of their local community, ultimately gaining deeper knowledge of content and a deeper appreciation for the role math plays in society. Examples from geometry and statistics will be provided.

PRESENTATION:

You can click the image below to find the PowerPoint that accompanied my presentation.

Screen Shot 2016-06-29 at 12.35.59 PM

For many of the service-learning projects that my students have completed I am indebted to the willing partnership of Mobile Loaves and Fishes. Here is some introductory information on this great ministry:

Community First! Village Goes Beyond Housing for Austin Homeless, from the Austinot

10 THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE IMPLEMENTING A SERVICE-LEARNING PROJECT:

The following are the foundational questions that you as an instructor should consider and reflect upon prior to implementing a service-learning project. This list is not meant to be chronological though some aspects will naturally precede others. Start by considering the course learning objectives and your method of assessing those objectives and then go from there.

1.What are the major learning objectives/big ideas/enduring understandings for your course?

2. What are real-world situations where students can apply the concepts studied in your course?

3. List some potential community partners along with some basic descriptors that may impact how your students work with each partner (ex: What is the size of the organization? What issues does the organization address? Is the organization non-profit, governmental, religiously affiliated? Etc.) In lieu of a partner organization you can also consider a general community need for students to address. List some general descriptors of the project involved in addressing this community need.

4. Look for potential matches between organizations on your list from question 3 and your responses to questions 1 and 2. If there are multiple potential matches then consider the pros/cons of each and list them. Be sure to recognize how your matching affects the organization of the project (large scale as a class v. small scale as groups), which in turn may affect your response to question 5 below.

5. Once you have begun narrowing potential community partners that offer opportunities for students to interact with course content, consider how will you assess students? What will be the final product? What expectations will you have for students throughout the project and how will you communicate that to the students?

6. How will students be organized to meet the objectives that they will be assessed on? Will students work as individuals, teams, as a whole class?

7. How will students be equipped to complete the project successfully? What will they have gained from the course up to the point of assigning the project that will aid them? What additional tools/skills/knowledge will students need as the project proceeds?

8. What will be the timeframe for the project? How will students be held accountable to the timeframe? At what points will students receive feedback on their progress?

9. Why should students care about the project? What will you do as an instructor to get student buy-in on the project?

10. How will students reflect throughout the project? What opportunities will you provide for students to pause and consider the work they have done?

HANDOUTS:

From my AP Statistics Project:

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Screen Shot 2016-06-29 at 1.10.27 PM

From my Geometry project:

Screen Shot 2016-06-29 at 1.08.28 PM Screen Shot 2016-06-29 at 1.08.42 PM

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EXTERNAL RESOURCES:

A Short Post on Infinity

I was recently asked to write a few paragraphs on the mathematical concept of infinity for a school news letter. I have copied it below. It is indeed brief for the subject that it deals with. I encourage those interested to do additional reading. I especially encourage reading the chapter on infinity in Math through the Eyes of Faith.

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Infinity is a difficult concept to grasp. We often misuse the term “infinity” to mean “something really, REALLY, big.” When Buzz Lightyear exclaims, “To infinity, and beyond!” the implication is “Let’s go really, really far… and then past that… I guess.” However, when we say that we worship an infinite God, we must be saying more than simply, “God is really, REALLY, big.” So then what are we saying? We can find some insight in mathematics.

To get an idea of infinity in mathematics we have to first be clear on some basic terms and definitions. We can count the numbers in a set by comparing them to the natural numbers (whole, positive numbers). {3,5,7,9} has 4 numbers because we can match each number in this set to the natural numbers 1 through 4: {1->3,2->5,3->7,4->9}. We say this set has size 4. A finite set is any set that can match to the numbers {1,2,3,…,n} where n is some number. An infinite set is a set that is not finite. In other words, there is no stopping point. The natural numbers themselves are infinite: {1,2,3,…}. They just keep going.

Now for some fun.

Consider the even numbers {2,4,6,8,…}. Also infinite. Half as big as the natural numbers right? Wrong. The set of even numbers, which is the set of natural numbers minus the odd numbers, is actually the SAME SIZE as the natural numbers!!! This seems counterintuitive, but we can match each even to the natural numbers {1->2, 2->4, 3->6, 4->8…}. For any even number you can think of, I can give you the natural number it pairs with. We can also prove that the set of all fractions {1/1, 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, …, 2/1, 2/2, 2/3, ….} which intuitively seems much bigger than the set of natural numbers, is also the SAME SIZE as the natural numbers.

So is every infinite set the same size? Nope. The set of all real numbers (every decimal expansion) is infinite, but LARGER than the set of natural numbers. This was proven by George Cantor in the late 1800’s. In fact, it has been proven there are infinitely many different sizes of infinity! Try wrapping your brain around that. Cantor spent his whole life working with concepts of infinity… and he went insane… seriously.

So when we say that we worship an infinite God, what are we saying? From a math perspective there are some familiar aspects about infinity, but it is also wholly different than anything we have ever encountered. It seems to follow rules of logic, yet it is surprising and mysterious. A lot of the characteristics of God that may seem paradoxical on the surface (transcendent yet immanent, perfectly just and yet perfectly gracious, one and three) may not be so paradoxical when you are talking about the infinite.

I’m not proposing any answers to questions of faith based on mathematics. It is my hope that you will see how studying math may give us just as much opportunity to reflect on the wonder of God as does a beautiful painting, song, or piece of poetry.

Enjoy pondering the infinite!

[After my initial post, I received another great comment from Scott Eberle that I thought would be worth including in the post itself]

Infinity is such a great subject for exploring the impact of our faith on mathematics!

Yes, Cantor suffered from depression and had multiple mental breakdowns, partly because of the intense opposition to his ideas. But what is really interesting to me is the whole reason he pursued the study of infinity to begin with.

Up until Cantor’s time, Aristotle’s idea that “actual infinity” does not exist was generally accepted by everyone. This was Aristotle’s way of avoiding the seeming paradoxes associated with infinity. Aristotle taught that we could accept “potential infinity”—that we could always keep going out as far as we needed—but that a real, “actual infinity” does not exist; we can never “get there.” And because mathematicians could not figure out how to deal with infinite paradoxes (like there being as many even numbers as whole numbers), Aristotle’s ideas were accepted. A few mathematicians, like Bolzano and Galileo, toyed with attempts to study actual infinity, but without modern set theory, they did not get very far.

Cantor, on the other hand, was a devout believer. He knew that God was infinite and that “actual infinity” must really exist. And because of this deep-seated conviction, he passionately pursued the study of infinity and developed set theory to describe infinite sets in the face of much opposition, especially from Kronecker, one of his teachers. Cantor insisted that his pursuit of infinity was founded on the theological premise that infinity was an attribute of God and that it was right for us to study it. Studying infinity, for Cantor, was a call of God.

At the time, many mathematicians rejected Cantor’s work and there was quite a lot of opposition. Today, virtually all mathematicians accept it, and the set theory he developed is today considered the very foundation for all mathematics. A real story of faith.